Updates to Wines of Long Island, 3rd ed.

Updates to Wines of Long Island, 3rd ed., since it was published.

The book was published on August 19, 2019; since then, significant changes have taken place in the wineries of Long Island. This, of course, is no surprise. I knew that my book would be out-of-date the day it was published. But I’m not planning to write yet another edition. I haven’t even sold all the copies that I had printed so am still out of pocket. However, it’s now possible to update a book online, so I urge all the purchasers of my book to read this and even download it for reference when using the book.

First, the really good news: not a single winery in Long Island went out of business due to the Covid outbreak. In fact, the wineries thrived in 2020, partly because people couldn’t travel abroad, so locals and people from the City made their way to Long Island Wine Country.

Indeed, the Long Island Wine Council has changed its name to Long Island Wine Country, and as of May 2021 has 30 members, up from 24 at the time of publication.

Recently, three wineries have changed their names. Most notably, Shinn Estate, which was sold by Barbara Shinn and her husband, David Page in 2017, is now Rose Hill, according to an article in the Northforker by Grant Parpan (April 15, 2021). The owners, Randy and Barbara Frankel, felt that enough time had passed and they wanted a name that resonated for them. Rose Hill is a neighborhood in Manhattan where they first lived, and though the terrain of the vineyard is flat as a pancake, they chose the name Rose Hill for apparently sentimental reasons.

The second winery to change its name is Laurel Lake, which changed hands this winter when it was sold by the Chilean consortium that had owned it. The new owner, Dan Abrams of ABC News, also chose a personal name of great sentimental meaning, taking the names of his two young children, Everett and Emily, and deriving from them the logo EV&EM. For now, Juan Sepúlveda continues as the winemaker. While Rose Hill is now an official and registered name, EV&EM will not be official until this summer. Sentimental names are not unusual, by the way. Consider Channing Daughters, named in honor of the late Walter Channing’s two daughters when that winery was established, or Martha Clara, named for the mother of Robert Entemann, who purchased the property 1978, initially as a horse farm, but eventually it became a 100-acre vineyard, which was recently bought by a Mexican winemaking family, Ribero-González, which renamed it RGNY.

Then, Sal Diliberto, now 75, decided that it was time to sell his eponymous winery and vineyard, given that none of his children was interested in continuing the business, and it was purchased in February 2021 by a young couple from Riverhead, Jacqui and Greg Goodale. They have renamed it Terra Vite Winery & Vineyard. They hired Kelly Koch, formerly of Macari, as their winemaker, which means that they’ll be making very good wine in the future. The tasting room and winery have been renovated and opened again for business on Memorial Day.  diliberto-long-island-wine-country

Another name change since publication is that of Chronicle Wine at Peconic Cellar Door. This needs some explanation. Originally, Alie Shaper and Robin Epperson-McCarthy were independent winemakers. A few years ago they decided to offer their labels from a tasting room on Peconic Lane that they called Peconic Cellar Door. That is now Chronicle Wines at Peconic Cellar Door, but their individual labels remain. In the book Alie’s main brand, BOE, has its own entry, though she has other labels of her own, including Shindig, As If, and Haywater Cove. So too does Robin have her own entry under Saltbird Cellars. Today they would be written of as a single entry, which by no means would diminish their individual accomplishments. In fact, it’s a real and very successful partnership.

In December of 2020 Juan E. Micieli-Martinez, the former winemaker of Martha Clara Vineyards, and his sommelier wife Bridget Quinn Micieli-Martinez, proudly unveil Montauk Daisy Wines in collaboration with Theresa Dilworth and her husband Mineo Shimura of Comtesse Therese Vineyard. Collectively, the group shares 80 years of experience within the Long Island Wine industry. Juan and Bridget, after multiple years of making wine and running operations for many noteworthy producers including Pellegrini Vineyards, Shinn Estate Vineyards, Martha Clara Vineyards, Palmer Vineyards, Clovis Point, and Premium Wine Group, decided it was time they produce wine for themselves. So now there is a new winery, formed taking the fruit of the Comtesse Therese vineyard and Juan making the wines at PWG. This deserves a blog post of its own, which should be forthcoming this summer.

Most remarkable may be the resurrection of the Peconic Bay Winery, now Peconic Bay Vineyard, purchased by Stefan Soloviev, with Stacey Lynne (formerly Mrs. Stefan Soloviev) listed as the owner, and Ken Cereola is the General Manager. Happily, winemaker Greg Gove has returned to his old haunt to resume his work and continue producing excellent and distinctive wines. Furthermore, Evan Ducz, who was at Sparkling Pointe, is the tasting room manager, which means that the room will be very well-managed and run. The winery had been closed for eight years and the vines had been tended by other wineries, so they’re in very good shape. There are now 125 acres planted to grapevines. The winery and its tasting room officially opened in May. As the winery had been closed when the book was published, it was not included, but it will have a new blog post dedicated to it pending an interview with Stacey, which we hope we can do this coming June.

In the meantime, a few wineries are currently for sale: Osprey’s Dominion and Bedell are now on the market and Castello di Borghese is selling a parcel of acres along with the family house, but not the tasting room. Meanwhile, they continue producing wine as they always have.

If you haven’t yet bought my book, please do so here, and download this page to insert in it.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7 thoughts on “Updates to Wines of Long Island, 3rd ed.

  1. Michael Barrett

    Jose – I ordered your book through Amazon and received an email from them saying the book had not shipped to me within their specified time so I needed to contact you about when it would ship and I would receive it. I will be visiting Long Island wineries in August and would really like to have your book before then to prepare me. If it is easier, I can cancel the Amazon book order and order it directly from you. Just let me know. Thanks.

    Mike

    1. JoseM-L Post author

      Mike, I apologize for the problems with your Amazon order. Strangely, Amazon would not allow me to access your order and several requests for help went unheeded. I appreciate your interest in my book, but please order it directly from my Website. As soon as you place the order, Paypal will notify me and I’ll send you the book directly.

      1. Michael Barrett

        Hi Jose – thanks for trying so hard to sort out things with Amazon. I am sorry for your struggles, strange. I ordered the book from your site. Since I have your ear, I thought I would ask for any recommendations for wineries to visit. So far, I have Bedell, Macari, Chronicle Wines, Lenz, Paumonk, Raphael and Osprey’s Dominion with reservations or plans to visit if they do not take reservations. I will also try to visit Channing Daughters and Wolffer. Any others you would suggest? Thanks again.

        Mike

        1. JoseM-L Post author

          Channing Daughters is a must, as is Wölffer’s. They are not to be missed. Channing has some of the most interesting wines on the island, such as an “orange” Rubolla Gialla, and Wölffer’s make some of the best wines on the island, along with Bedell, Paumonok, Lenz, and a few others. You’ve already chosen well. I hope that you have enough time to visit them all. Thank you so much for ordering my book. I’m sorry for the long delay. Amazon has been maddening. Cheers, and here’s to a terrific visit.

          1. Michael Barrett

            Thanks Jose – the only reason I have not locked down visits to Channing Daughters and Wolffer is they do not take reservations this far in advance. I will add in Anthony Nappa’s wines. Thanks again.

        2. JoseM-L Post author

          Oh, yes, and since you’re going to visit Chronicle Wines and their two terrific winemakers, stop by next door and visit Anthony Nappa’s tasting room. Anthony make some really excellent and interesting wines tool. (He’s the winemaker at Raphael.)

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